Geography

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Geography 2017-11-14T15:09:41+00:00
Introduction

“Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant…. a great adventure with a purpose.” (Michael Palin)

Geography at Coloma Convent Girls’ school will inspire you to develop a lifelong interest in geography and a curiosity about our world. Through each key stage, you will enjoy learning about people and their societies, economies, cultures and the environment. There are fieldwork opportunities spread throughout the key stages to enrich knowledge and understanding beyond the classroom. Also, you will learn and develop a wide range of skills which most employers view as highly invaluable in the workplace.

Furthermore, there is a great necessity to create geographers in the future who will help us understand unforeseeable world issues at both a global and local scale. Food and energy security, the spread of disease, the causes and consequences of migration, and the impacts of economic change on places and communities, are all but a few of the challenges facing the next generation, which geographers must help solve.

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Year 7 will start their learning journey by developing the four main assessment objectives through a number of units of study. The main four assessment objectives that are covered through Key Stage 3 are: locational knowledge, geographical understanding, geographical enquiry, and geographical skills. Year 7 can look forward to studying map skills, the UK (with a focus on national parks), ecosystems, cold environments, and Africa.

In addition to this, the programme of study in Year 7 has been tailored to ensure all students will develop essential map skills to a good standard to competently read an Ordnance Survey (OS) map. Also, the programme of study ensures all students have good knowledge of the ‘geography basics’ i.e.: map of the world, continents, major seas and oceans, mountain ranges, major rivers, and capital cities.

Year 8

Year 8 continue their learning journey in geography by developing the four main assessment objectives through the following units of study: Coastal processes, landforms and Coastal management, Population, Migration, Weather and climate, and Climate change.

Year 9

Year 9 complete their KS3 learning journey in Geography by developing the four main assessment objectives through the following units of study: Natural hazards (tectonic and climatic), Natural resources, Sustainability, and Economic change (with a focus on development, globalisation and megacities).

Key Stage 4

Year 10 and 11

KS4 geographers study AQA GCSE Geography (8035).

The GCSE encourages students to:

  • Develop and extend their knowledge of locations, places, environments and processes, and of different scales including global; and of social, political and cultural contexts (know geographical material);
  • Gain understanding of the interactions between people and environments, change in places and processes over space and time, and the inter-relationship between geographical phenomena at different scales and in different contexts (think like a geographer);
  • Develop and extend their competence in a range of skills including those used in fieldwork, in using maps and GIS and in researching secondary evidence, including digital sources; and develop their competence in applying sound enquiry and investigative approaches to questions and hypotheses (study like a geographer);
  • Apply geographical knowledge, understanding, skills and approaches appropriately and creatively to real world contexts, including fieldwork, and to contemporary situations and issues; and develop well-evidenced arguments drawing on their geographical knowledge and understanding (applying geography).

The subject content is split into four units:

  1. Living with the physical environment (Content covered in Year 10)
  • The content is split into sections, with each section focusing on a particular theme;
  • Content includes: Natural hazards, Tectonic hazards, Weather hazards, Climate change, Ecosystems, Tropical rainforests, Hot deserts, UK landscapes, Coastal and River landscapes.

2.  Challenges in the human environment (Content covered in Year 11)

  • The content is split into sections, with each section focusing on a particular theme;
  • Content includes: The urban world, Urban change in the UK, Sustainable urban development, Development gap, Nigeria: a newly-emerging economy, the changing UK economy, Resource management, Food management and Water management.

3. Geographical applications (Content covered in Year 10 & 11)

  • The content sets out the requirements for fieldwork and issue evaluation
  • Students conduct fieldwork (day trips and/or residential) to fulfil this requirement.
  1. Geographical skills (Content covered in Year 10 & 11)
  • The content sets out the geographical skills that students are required to develop and demonstrate i.e.: cartographic, graphical and statistical skills.

Public Exam details:

The GCSE is designed to be taken over two years, and is a linear qualification. This means that in order to achieve a GCSE in this subject, students must complete all assessments at the end of the course and in the same series.

Students must complete three written exams:

Paper 1: Living with the physical environment

  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 88 marks (including 3 marks for SPaG))
  • 35 % of GCSE

Paper 2: Challenges in the human environment

  • 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 88 marks (including 3 marks for SPaG))
  • 35 % of GCSE

Paper 3: Geographical applications

  • 1 hour 15 minutes
  • 76 marks (including 6 marks for SPaG)
  • 30 % of GCSE

Pre-release resources booklet made available 12 weeks before Paper 3 exam.

Key Stage 5

Year 12 and 13

KS5 geographers study AQA A-LEVEL Geography (7037).

The A-Level encourages students to challenge perceptions and stimulate their investigative and analytical skills. The units of study to be covered over the two year course are a mixture of both ‘old school’ and new geographies, to reflect the world today.

The A-Level encourages students to:

  • Develop their knowledge of locations, places, processes and environments, at all geographical scales from local to global across the specification as a whole;
  • Develop an in-depth understanding of the selected core and non-core processes in physical and human geography at a range of temporal and spatial scales, and of the concepts which illuminate their significance in a range of locational contexts;
  • Recognise and be able to analyse the complexity of people–environment interactions at all geographical scales, and appreciate how these underpin understanding of some of the key issues facing the world today;
  • Develop their understanding of, and ability to apply, the concepts of place, space, scale and environment, that underpin both the national curriculum and GCSE, including developing a more nuanced understanding of these concepts;
  • Gain understanding of specialised concepts relevant to the core and non-core content. These must include the concepts of causality, systems, equilibrium, feedback, inequality, representation, identity, globalisation, interdependence, mitigation and adaptation, sustainability, risk, resilience and thresholds;
  • Improve their understanding of the ways in which values, attitudes and circumstances have an impact on the relationships between people, place and environment, and develop the knowledge and ability to engage, as citizens, with the questions and issues arising;
  • Become confident and competent in selecting, using and evaluating a range of quantitative and qualitative skills and approaches, (including observing, collecting and analysing geo-located data) and applying them as an integral part of their studies;
  • Understand the fundamental role of fieldwork as a tool to understand and generate new knowledge about the real world, and become skilled at planning, undertaking and evaluating fieldwork in appropriate situations;
  • Apply geographical knowledge, understanding, skills and approaches in a rigorous way to a range of geographical questions and issues, including those identified in fieldwork, recognising both the contributions and limitations of geography;
  • Develop as critical and reflective learners, able to articulate opinions, suggest relevant new ideas and provide evidenced argument in a range of situations.

The subject content is split into four units:

1. Physical geography

Content includes:

  • Water and carbon cycles
  • Hot desert systems and landscapes
  • Coastal systems and landscapes
  • Glacial systems and landscapes
  • Hazards
  • Ecosystems under stress

2. Human geography

Content includes:

  • Global systems and global governance
  • Changing places
  • Contemporary urban environments
  • Population and the environment
  • Resource security

3. Geography fieldwork investigation

Content includes:

  • Fieldwork requirements
  • Investigation requirements

4. Geographical skills

Content includes:

  • Geographical skills checklist

Public Exam details:

The A-Level is designed to be taken over two years, and is a linear qualification. This means that in order to an A-Level in this subject, students must complete all assessments at the end of the course and in the same series.

Students must complete two written exams, and submit one 4,000 piece of coursework.

Paper 1: Physical Geography

  • 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 120 marks
  • 40% of A-level

Paper 2: Human Geography

  • 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 120 marks
  • 40% of A-level

Coursework report

  • 3,000–4,000 words
  • 60 marks
  • 20% of A-level
  • marked by teachers
  • moderated by AQA